Watch out for ducks on the road

Spring time is breeding season for ducks, which means more of them are out and about across the shire. 

It’s not unusual to see a family of ducks crossing the road in the Highlands, a dangerous act for both the animals and drivers. 

DUCKS CROSSING: Motorists have urged to keep their eyes peeled for ducks during the spring months. Photo: Southern Highland News.

DUCKS CROSSING: Motorists have urged to keep their eyes peeled for ducks during the spring months. Photo: Southern Highland News.

One Highlands residents has asked drivers to be more aware of ducks, after he witnessed the death of several ducks. 

Peter (last name withheld) from Burradoo has witnessed cars run over ducks twice over the past couple of weeks. 

“People need to have a bit more respect for nature and slow down if they can,” he said. 

The first incident Peter witnessed occurred in Mittagong on October 26. 

“A car ran straight over [a group of ducks],” he said. 

“Two little ones died instantly and two more were put down after we took them to the vet.”

The next incident happened on November 7 near Oxley College. 

“Again a car just ran straight over them, one little one had it’s wing ripped right off,” Peter said. 

“I just urge people to take a bit more care and watch out for these animals.”

While drivers mustn’t put their own safety at risk while at the wheel, wildlife services have asked drivers to be aware of the animals. 

Ironmines Veterinary Clinic’s Dr Bob Rheinberger said people should evaluate a duck that has been hit.

“Get a good look at it if you can get close enough and see what damage has been done,” he said. 

“If the injuries are severe they are sometimes brought into us and we have a good look at them, sometimes they go into shock after they’ve been hit so we give them a bit of time to see how they do.” 

If the ducks can be rehabilitated they are sent to WIRES for further care, while others are euthanised if their injuries are too severe. 

Mr Rheinberger said it was often the adult ducks that were injured rather than the ducklings. 

“We do tend to find the adult ducks coming in more often because they wait for the chicks to cross,” he said. ​

“They are at the back of the pack so they are often the ones that get hit," he said. 

If you do injure a duck you can contact a vet, Wingecarribee WIRES at 4862 1788 or 1300 094 737 or Wildlife Rescue South Coast. 

Wildlife Rescue South Coast has a 24/7 answering service on 0418 427 214 to assist with injured or displaced wildlife.