Horticulturalists help Tulip Time bloom

GREEN THUMBS: Jesse Mauger, Tayler Nash and Orry Squires planted bulbs in Corbett Gardens in May in preparation for the annual Tulip Time festival. Photo: Supplied
GREEN THUMBS: Jesse Mauger, Tayler Nash and Orry Squires planted bulbs in Corbett Gardens in May in preparation for the annual Tulip Time festival. Photo: Supplied

Tens of thousands of people are expected to descend on Bowral from Tuesday for Tulip Time.

Both locals and visitors will flock to Corbett Gardens to take in the colour and designs of our gardens.

However few people see the preparation and hard work that goes on behind the scenes.

This year, horticulturalists planted more than 100,000 bulbs and 15,000 annual flowers across the Wingecarribee.

To ensure a lasting display, the team has chosen an assortment of early, mid and late blooming varieties.

Council’s manager of open space, recreation and building maintenance Greg Bray said the team took pride in its work.

“Our horticultural team is proud to work on one of the country’s largest floral displays,” Mr Bray said.

“It provides them with an opportunity to show case their hard work to residents and visitors alike.

“Seeing the display come to life and the joy that it brings to people’s lives is truly rewarding.”

Mr Bray said there were some challenges for the team.

“The most challenging part is working in adverse weather conditions,” he said.

“[Supply] can be difficult. Only a limited number of suppliers can supply the quantities we need.”

Horticulturalists work year-round on projects throughout the Wingecarribee. This includes one horticulturalist, who planted tulips for the inaugural display back in 1960.

The theme of this year’s festival is ‘creating memories’. The charity partners are the Wingecarribee Adult Day Care Centre and Dementia Australia.

The festival runs from Tuesday, September 18 to Monday, October 1.

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