cancer Council launches season two of The Thing About Cancer podcasts

Julie McCrossin, hosts The Thing About Cancer podcast series, which aims to help answer questions for people diagnosed with cancer and discusses peronal experiences. Photo: supplied
Julie McCrossin, hosts The Thing About Cancer podcast series, which aims to help answer questions for people diagnosed with cancer and discusses peronal experiences. Photo: supplied

“Research shows that people often have unmet information needs after a cancer diagnosis.”

To help meet this need, Cancer Council NSW has launched the second season of its podcast series The Thing About Cancer.

Hosted by renowned broadcaster and cancer survivor Julie McCrossin, the podcast series features interviews with health professionals who talk through answers to complex questions surrounding a diagnosis, treatment, symptoms and side effects, as well as conversations with people about their personal experience.

Southern Highlands residents affected by cancer are encouraged to download the latest episode of season two.

The new episode discusses the impact of brain fog – also known as chemo brain ­– on cancer patients.

In the “Brain Fog and Cancer” episode Ms McCrossin, speaks to medical oncologist Professor Janette Vardy, who has been studying the phenomenon for over a decade.

“Interestingly, ‘brain fog’ was a term coined by cancer patients. The main thing that people complain about is that their memory and concentration is not as sharp after their cancer diagnosis as it was before,” Professor Vardy said in the episode.

Cancer Council community programs coordinator, Megan Mattingly said the podcast format was an easy option for Southern Highland cancer patients experiencing brain fog to access cancer information.

“Podcasts are an increasingly popular platform for accessing information. Many cancer survivors experience difficulty concentrating, focusing and remembering things, and this may be caused by the cancer itself, the impact of cancer treatments, or side-effects of medication,” she said.

“While researchers still aren’t certain of the exact causes of brain fog after cancer, our new podcast episode provides strategies and recommends resources that can help people to better manage this side effect.”

The Thing About Cancer podcast is available through a range of digital channels, including iTunes and the Cancer Council NSW website: cancercouncil.com.au/podcasts.

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