Retford Park flora restoration begins

A TREE planting ceremony has kicked off the revival of trees and flora at Retford Park.

Taking advantage of the warmer spring weather, planting began to restore the avenue leading to the historic building.

Landscape architect Robert Smart said he had been working for six years to plan the new trees, bushes, shrubs and flowers for the sub-division.

“It was emotional to see the Monterey Pines to go, but they are living and they do die, so we needed to replace them,” he said.

“We’re going to plant a traditional mixed avenue to keep the historical flavour when it’s mature.”

The tree was officially planted by Councillor Larry Whipper and The National Trust of Australia (NSW) president Dr Clive Lucas OBE.

Clr Whipper said it was great to be part of the renewal process.

“It’s always nice to plant a seed and watch it grow,” he said.

Species chosen for the balance of the property were also selected for their inherent beauty, natural suitability to the environment, long-life, and their interconnection with the historic property.

The mix of deciduous and evergreen varieties to be planted includes Hoop Pine, Monterey Cypress, Kauri Pine, Sour Gum, Callery Pear, Pin Oak, Green Vase Zelkova, Himilayan Cedar, Camden Woolybutt, Narrow-leaved Perrermint, English Oak, and Forest Red Gum.

More than 700 trees will be planted as a result of the renewal.

Mr Smart said the plantings would take place across the two sub-divisions: The Acreage and The Highlands.

“We are planting quite mature trees, so current residents will enjoy seeing them grow,” he said. 

“But our children and their children will also benefit from the work beginning today as the new trees mature to provide stately beauty and shelter for generations to come.”

In addition, the new owners of the 152 lots sold are obligated to plant a minimum of one large tree in their front gardens, and a second in their back gardens, providing a further 304 new trees.

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