Mary dances in the street

Grandchildren of Joan Smyth, Gabrielle (6) and Rosana (4) Smyth have an extraordinary theory to explain Mary Poppins' switch-aroo. Photo suppied

Grandchildren of Joan Smyth, Gabrielle (6) and Rosana (4) Smyth have an extraordinary theory to explain Mary Poppins' switch-aroo. Photo suppied

QUESTION marks continue to surround the Mary Poppins mystery.

While Mary remains facing east, the public continue to scratch their heads about her mysterious rotation. 

Project coordinator Paul McShane said theories about her mystical shift had been flooding in, but the mystery remained unresolved.

Mr McShane said one of the most interesting theories came from the grandchildren of Bowral resident Joan Smyth.

Six-year-old Gabrielle and four-year-old Rosana Smyth believed Mary had "come to life one night and danced around the playground having fun until the morning light appeared when she quickly jumped back onto the pedestal. Unfortunately she had too much fun during her adventures and she turned the wrong way when she became still again."

Mr McShane has deemed this as "one of the best theories yet".

The statue's sculptor Tanya Bartlett was also mystified when she heard of Mary's chim switch-aroo, but was not surprised.

"It's her magic, she's up to her tricks," Ms Bartlett said.

"It doesn't surprise me, but I hope she behaves herself a little," Ms Bartlett said. 

Paul and Melissa McShane are still asking the community to send in their theories to contact@mary-poppins-birthplace.net to help solve this head scratcher.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop